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Some Sar-i-Pul residents still use traditional watermill

Some Sar-i-Pul residents still use traditional watermill

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18 Jan 2023 - 20:26
Some Sar-i-Pul residents still use traditional watermill
author avatar
18 Jan 2023 - 20:26

SAR-I-PUL (Pajhwok): People in northern Sar-i-Pul province have kept the traditional Watermill system for grinding grains which is disappearing with the advancement of technology.

Some residents believed that the quality of flour produced from watermill was better than the quality of flour produced in the advance flour mills.

Obaidullah, the resident of Sar-i-Pul City, told Pajhwok Afghan News: “Water mills have a long history in the country, but with the advancement of technology, this system is disappearing and now its number is less than before.”

He said the quality of flour produced from the watermill is better than the quality of flour produce in the advance flour mill.

He termed the watermills a historic tradition in the country and asked officials to stop its disappearance.

“The structure of a water mill consists of a bowl in which grains are thrown, two circular stones stuck together with a hole in the middle and connected to a wheel, which rotates with water and as a result the grains are ground into flour,” he said.

Ahmad, 65, said there was huge difference in the quality of flour produce in watermill and in advance mill.

“Watermills converted grain into flour naturally but advance flour crashed the grain with speed and burned the flour due to which it lose its nature,” he added.

Ghulam Ali, the resident of Syedabad village, said watermills were related to our culture and it had thousand years of history in our country.

He asked the government to take steps in maintaining this culture and tradition.

“People believed  that grain crashed in watermills were of high quality compared to the flour from advance mill because later burned the flour,” he said.

Abdul Malik Baloch, deputy director of Information and Cultural Affairs, said watermills culture in the country go back to 5,000 years.

“We don’t own them and it belong to individuals thus and we call upon them to ensure the maintenance and protection of these mills,” he said.

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